Literature

TODAY: In 1883, William Carlos Williams is born.    “If you were to read for 16 hours a day at 300 words per minute, you could keep up with a world containing an average population of 100,000 living Harper Lees.” Randall Munroe answers a pressing question: Was it ever possible for one person to read every book
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TODAY: In 1950, American literary critic and scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. is born.   “It took months of OCD treatment and two Brené Brown books to understand there is no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ in writing—there are only decisions.” Elissa Bassist reflects on treating her writers’ block by treating her OCD. | Lit Hub Memoir
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TODAY: In 1915, P. G. Wodehouse’s short story “Extricating Young Gussie” is published in The Saturday Evening Post, introducing the characters Jeeves and Bertie.   “There is a kind of freedom in divorcing the maker from what is made.” Kailyn McCord considers the myth of the Made Writer. | Lit Hub Writing Life What do
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) was a leading figure in English Romanticism. As well as co-authoring the landmark 1798 collection Lyrical Ballads with his friend William Wordsworth, Coleridge was also a critic of unmatched genius, whose pronouncements on Shakespeare, Romanticism, and the literary imagination remain influential even now. Below, we select and introduce some of the
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September 14, 2022, 3:15pm Today, the National Book Foundation announced the longlist for the 2022 National Book Award for Translated Literature, which includes ten titles originally written in nine different languages: Arabic, Danish, French, German, Japanese, Norwegian, Persian, Polish, and Spanish. The judges for this year’s award are Nick Buzanski, Veronica Esposito, Ann Goldstein (Chair),
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TODAY: In 1814, Francis Scott Key, American lawyer and amateur poet, pens “The Star-Spangled Banner.”   Olivia Rutigliano on the legacy of legendary filmmaker Jean Luc Godard (who disliked e-books before they were invented). | Lit Hub Film Chinelo Okparanta considers William Styron’s Confessions of Nat Turner and the ethics of writing across racial identities. |
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The following from Scholastique Mukasonga’s Kibogo. Gallimard published her autobiographical account of growing up in war-torn Rwanda Inyenzi ou les Cafards (Cockroaches). She is also the author of La femme aux pieds nus (The Barefoot Woman) and L’Iguifou (Igifu). Her first novel, Our Lady Of The Nile, won the Ahamadou Kourouma prize and the Renaudot
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