Literature

TODAY: In 1982, John Cheever and Djuna Barnes die; both the Suburbs and Bohemia lose their patron saints.    Jennette Gordon-Reed and Elizabeth Hinton talk to Jelani Cobb about their new books, On Juneteenth and America on Fire, and the nation’s ongoing struggle to make sense of protest and rebellion, from emancipation to the murder of George Floyd.
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TODAY: In 1958, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart is published by William Heinemann.  “The term ‘Internet Literature’ seems perfectly designed to divide us, but we’re getting it all wrong.” Shya Scanlon on our love-hate relationship with that new, wobbly genre. | Lit Hub Criticism Laura Raicovich considers Nan Goldin’s protest against the Sacklers, the myth
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The Gospel of Mark is the earliest, the shortest, and in many ways, the most mysterious of the four gospels in the New Testament. Thought to have been written some time after AD 64 (when Nero began persecuting Christians following the great fire of Rome), Mark’s gospel shows the hallmarks of having been written for
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TODAY: In 1816 at the Villa Diodati, Lord Byron reads Fantasmagoriana to his house guests—Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont, and John Polidori—and challenges each to write a ghost story, which culminates in Mary Shelley writing Frankenstein (read more about it here).   How Edgar Allan Poe’s 1844 balloon hoax, splashed across the front page of the
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With “I Know”, Jason Shand has crafted a letter of forgiveness to himself. One of the beautiful things about music is its ability to communicate emotions, but to also put us in the headspace of the performer. Jason Shand is a truly stirring soul, whose love of classic, inoffensive rock like Seal, Fiona Apple, but
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TODAY: In 1894, Norweigan novelist Trygve Gulbranssen is born.    “There are no major or minor leagues between genres.” Marissa Levien wonders why anyone limits themselves to a single genre (and why bookstore patrons keep re-shelving books). | Lit Hub In praise of camp: Amelia Abraham considers Susan Sontag, coming out, and the joys of
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